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THE UNFORESEEN FRAUD


JESUS FRAUDULENTLY PRETENDED
TO FULFIL OLD TESTAMENT PREDICTIONS


Christians claim that God can see what is going to happen in the future. He is a celestial fortune-teller. They also claim that in order that we might be able to show that Jesus was his Messiah, Prophet and Son that God foretold things about him in the Old Testament. For that argument to deserve any consideration, it is necessary for Jesus to fulfil the prophecies in a way that cannot be humanly explained.

 

Nearly everything Jesus did reminds us of something in the Old Testament.  It is as if the gospel writers mined those texts to invent stories.  Mark is the first gospel.  Eugene Boring reads the start of Mark as essentially saying, “The gospel of Jesus Christ, and the following narrative, are in accord with what God spoke through the prophet Isaiah.”

One is struck by the importance that the biblical Jesus attached to fulfilling what the prophets of the Old Testament allegedly foreseen about him (Matthew 5:17; Luke 24:27; Luke 24:44; Matthew 26:56; Luke 4:20,21; Acts 3:18; Luke 22:37; Acts 10:43; 1 Corinthians 15:3,4; Matthew 2:4-6; Acts 13:29; Acts 17:2,3). The biggest problem with this is that it is men writing about Jesus and not Jesus himself who make this claim. What is wrong with that is that the men were biased towards promoting Jesus and could have written his story to fit the Old Testament. It would be different if we could get Jewish or Roman records that could not have been falsified that backed up say the gospel assertion that Jesus disappeared from the tomb, a major alleged fulfilment of the prophecies. And if we could have a book written by Jesus himself that was provably not known until after the New Testament was written so that we could hear the man himself. If Jesus had been the Son of God, God would have left proof that Jesus did the things that the Old Testament allegedly predicted and it would be up to us to decide if he really fulfilled them or rigged events to fit them.

The other problem with this doctrine that Jesus was foreseen is that the Old Testament made predictions meant to serve as credentials for Jesus is that they were too easy to deliberately fulfil. They are not very specific which makes it easier again to fulfil them deliberately. Many Christians who believe in Jesus still admit that many of the prophecies about Jesus were not about him at all and some of them can be proved to have concerned somebody else (page 34, Jesus Hypotheses).

Many men could fulfil the prophets the way Jesus supposedly did. Any firstborn Jew from Bethlehem – not necessarily born there for the prophecy only says the Messiah will come from Bethlehem – could have claimed to be the Messiah spoken of by the prophet who said that he would be conceived of a virgin. He could say that he had the royal blood of David in his veins. And preach in Galilee awhile. And claim to be God and that the evil he did was for mysterious purposes so that he could allege that it was really good to get people to buy his pretensions to divinity. And claim to have sent a precursor and if that precursor does not seem to recognise him (as the Messiah like John did in his last days with regard to Jesus) he could say he sent him by means of a heavenly decree and he has betrayed him or he is being secretive about what he knows. Who was betrayed by his friends. And tell parables. And call himself a priest like Melchizidek. And do what he called miracles. And ride a donkey into Jerusalem. And be the stone rejected by the builders or leaders. And be spoken against by lying witnesses. And be slapped and mocked. And get beaten or hurt so that he is cut all over and get wounded hands and feet which he says were wounded to show the thugs thought he should not be working for God with his hands and his feet. He could pierce his own hands and feet to fulfil the prophecy. He could arrange for a gang to cast lots for his clothes. He could be allegedly stabbed. The person could have got someone to pretend to stab him, the fake superficial wound having been marked on before the hoax. He could claim that when he dies in his bed or wherever it will be for the sins of others. He could arrange that he would be buried in a rich man’s tomb. If he had been dumped in a common grave he could have been removed later. Who predicted that he will be raised from the dead but not say when just like the scriptures don’t. It is easy enough to get a conspiracy of deceit up to get these things done. And he could ascend into Heaven spiritually after his death. There will always be somebody to have dreams or visions to conform that he is there. The fact that some if not all the corresponding prophecies were not real prophecies makes it easier to fraud. The less a man fulfils the better when most are not prophecies. If Jesus hadn't fulfilled all the alleged prophecies that would make no difference to the Church. It simply ignores any prophecy or anything that resembles a prophecy that doesn't fit. This method makes it so much easier for somebody to match Jesus in seeming to fulfil the seeming prophecies.

Even Psalm 22 which is supposed to refer to the crucifixion could be fulfilled by arranging to be beaten up and having your hands and feet pierced. It is even easier again when the real translation is “like the lion my hands and my feet”.

When a man claims that such easy deeds prove that he is from God that man is a fraud.

Anybody who tried to fulfil the prophecies but failed could say he will have another life in which the rest will come to pass. The texts that are taken to mean that the Messiah will be resurrected from the dead might as well be interpreted as promises of a reincarnation. Or a recovery from temporary death which lasts a few seconds or near-death. Jesus has not brought the kingdom of light and happiness to earth yet and there are more prophecies about that than there are alleged or real prophecies about the Messiah.

If one reads the prophecies it will be seen that they never say the public will be able to prove the things they say will happen happened. How do you prove a virgin conception for example?

There was no miracle in Jesus fulfilling the predictions. His keenness to argue that they proved he was who he said he was only proves that he was a man of lying lips. Anybody today who manages to fit the requirements of the oracles would have more right to be adored as God or the Son of God than Jesus for we can know them better. We would be sure they existed too!

The Seventy Weeks Prophecy was interpreted as messianic by the Jews who believed that the Messiah was around at the time of Christ but was anonymous. This prophecy from the Book of Daniel allegedly stated what time the Messiah would be on earth.

When a prophecy can be fulfilled by anybody it is not a prophecy at all. It cannot be taken seriously as a forecast or a proof for anything. This means we can eliminate the notion of supernatural fulfilment of prophecy by Jesus.

Christians take many bits of the Prophets and Psalms as predictions of Christ though one has only to read them in full to see that they are not even presented as predictions. There is nothing easier than fulfilling prophecies that are not prophecies and anyone could do it. It is unfair to take the line, “I will speak in parables”, as predicting that Jesus would do this and then take the vindictive bits that crave revenge on enemies as the sentiments of the author and not as predictions of Jesus. For instance, “Wash me thoroughly [and repeatedly] from my iniquity” (Psalm 51:2) is not taken to be a forecast about the sins of the Christ though if the parables line should be, so should it.

 

Luke's claim that Jesus took a scroll in the synagogue and read a piece of text is lies because Jesus could not move all around the scroll to do the reading for it was actually not a reading but selections from texts that were quite far apart in the scriptures which would have been in a very clumsy scroll form. The reading is a mix of Isaiah 61:1,2 and 58:6.

The Gospellers gave body to Jesus’ life-story using the Old Testament plots. This made it extra easy for them to say Jesus fulfilled this prophecy and that one.

A man who claims to be God’s final revelation and his Son and declares prophecies that do not exist to be his credentials is certainly a fake.

Jesus made too many mistakes to be really God or his promised prophet and this was one major one. According to the Bible a man who tells lies about God’s message is not his prophet (Deuteronomy 18). This means the promises of the Old Testament were not promises to send Jesus no matter how closely he fits the bill. For example, in the name of God, Jesus preached that one sincere prayer was as good as several and that all prayers were to be made in a spirit of submission to the will of God and accepting his right to do what he wanted and later he told the apostles to pray for this and that so one prayer was not enough.
 
The only proof that one needs that Jesus did not fulfil the Old Testament is this. In Luke 24 Jesus did not say “I am the Son of God and his prophet because I have risen from the dead and been seen”, but said that he was to rise for the prophets said it and the prophets’ words verified the resurrection. Therefore whatever Jesus would say about the meaning of the resurrection would be true just because he rose as the prophets said and not just because he rose. The function of the witnesses is to say that the prophets have been fulfilled with regard to the resurrection more than to say that the resurrection happened but they were only allowed to believe in the resurrection because they saw it predicted (Luke 24:45-48). In the Dives and Lazarus parable Jesus teaches that even a resurrection will not convince those who will not listen to the prophets and the Law of Moses. This puts his own resurrection below the writings of the biblical prophets in importance. If the prophets did not prophesy a resurrection then it never happened. The Old Testament prophecies of the resurrection are ambiguous at best and are too scarce of detail to give us confidence in Christ. Jesus stressed prophecy as his credential and said that his resurrection would only be a credential for him if it were prophesied. But his prophecies of the resurrection could have been written after the event. Even if Jesus fitted all the other prophecies the fact that the major one was not there and he thought it was, would prove that he was not the subject of the prophecies at all. Only a false prophet makes mistakes like that for there is no point in making prophecies if the subject of the prophecies who has to show that they are fulfilled misinterprets for he would only be the subject if he were a prophet himself and able to see what the prophets meant.

The Catholic book, The Virginal Conception and Bodily Resurrection of Jesus confesses that Jesus was not foreseen by the Old Testament and gives Isaiah’s prophecy about the young woman giving birth to a son called Emmanuel as an example of something that was supposed to predict Jesus and does not (page 15-16). The Bible never predicted the virgin birth of Jesus.

To become a Jesus is easy. All you need to do is put your best foot forward in public and pretend to be deaf or something so that if you sin you can blame your disability and say it was not a sin but a mistake. You can say that if people pray to God in your name they will be cured and inevitably there will be some who will say this worked. You can fake your death. The only thing missing is prophetic evidence. You need proof that you were predicted by God years before. To do this you need witnesses who will lie and testify to a man who has golden plates or something that he has miraculously translated or transcribed that he is telling the truth and hey presto you are a real rival to Jesus. At least the evidence for your existence would be better than that for Jesus for you would have been on radio and CCTV cameras! This shows the utter worthlessness of the Christian evidence that Jesus should be our boss and Lord and should be submitted to.

 

Farrell Till - writes on what he calls the Double-Application Dodge

 

"To deal with contextual problems like the one in Isaiah's virgin-birth prophecy, bibliolaters have invented the double-application doctrine. "Yes, the prophecy in Isaiah did refer primarily to an immediate situation," they admit, "but it contained also, as did many other prophecies, a double-entendre that, in this case, makes it applicable to the birth of Jesus too." Contextual evidence, of course, necessitates their admission that prophecies such as this one were indeed intended for the times in which they were made, but if inerrantists are going to claim a "double-application" of Isaiah 7:14, they have a responsibility to do more than just claim. They must also prove. If Isaiah really had a double-meaning in mind, then who was the virgin of that generation who gave birth to a son? That is a legitimate question, because if Isaiah meant virgin in the strictest sense with reference to a woman who would give birth 700 years later, then he had to mean virgin in the strictest sense for the woman of his time who would bear a son. If not, why not?

The truth is that evidence to prove a double-application theory isn't so easy to come by. In this case, we have nothing--absolutely nothing--but Matthew's unsubstantiated word that the birth of Jesus fulfilled Isaiah's prophecy. Isaiah said nothing in the context of the original passage to imply a double intention, and none of the other gospel writers in recording the circumstances of Jesus's birth in any way related the event to Isaiah's prophecy. This latter fact seems particularly significant in the case of Luke whose gospel account included many more details about both the annunciation of the birth and the actual event itself than did any of the others. Mark and John, in fact, were completely silent about the birth. Doesn't it seem strange, then, that this remarkable "prophecy fulfillment" would have been treated with silence by three of the four "inspired" writers who recorded the life of Jesus? Only Matthew mentioned it, and that is the sum total of the proof we have that Jesus's birth fulfilled Isaiah's "prophecy.""

 

I would add that Matthew would need to be a psychic to know if Isaiah or God had a double meaning.  Why would God predict something that made sense in Isaiah's day as if that was more important than the conception of Jesus the Messiah?  Why are all the major things in Jesus' life accompanied by double application style alleged prophecies?  Do not forget that even today most believers think the prophecies are great for they look good out of context and few bother or care to look.  Matthew was definitely overstretching his case for Jesus and lying.

 

Till refers to a verse from the Old Testament that shows all this prophecy stuff is just populist rubbish.  God says to Jeremiah, "At what instant I shall speak concerning a nation, and concerning a kingdom, to pluck up and to break down and to destroy it, if that nation, concerning which I have spoken, turn from their evil, I will repent of the evil that I thought to do to them. And at what instant I shall speak concerning a nation, and concerning a kingdom, to build and to plant it; if they do that which is evil in my sight, that they obey not my voice, then I will repent of the good, with which I said I would benefit them (18: 7-10).  So if the Bible predicts a Messiah who never comes it just means that God cancelled the plan to send one.  Any book can be passed off as the word of God with that disclaimer!  Go and write your own Bible then and predict until your heart is content.

Conclusion
 
Jesus’ central credential, the prophecies that spoke of him, proves that he was not the Son of God or the Messiah. And that is because the credential is based on bizarre and strained understandings of the prophecies and in fact many of the prophecies are not prophecies at all.  For somebody that was so into the written word of God and promoting it and who would have left footprints in sand why couldn't he invent printing?
 
BOOKS CONSULTED
 
Alleged Discrepancies of the Bible, John W Haley, Whitaker House, Pennsylvania, undated
Are There Hidden Codes in the Bible? Ralph O Muncaster, Harvest House Publishers, Eugene, Oregon, 2000
Attack on the Bible, John R Rice, Sword of the Lord, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, 1965
Bible Dictionary and Concordance, New American Bible, Catholic Edition, CD Stampley Enterprises, Charlotte Enterprises, Inc, North Carolina, 1971
Encyclopaedia of Bible Difficulties, Gleason W Archer, Zondervan, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1982
Evidence that Demands a Verdict, Vol 1, Alpha, Scripture Press Foundation, Bucks, 1995
God’s Word, Final, Infallible and Forever, Floydd C McElveen, Gospel Truth Ministries, Grand Rapids, 1985
In Search of Certainty, John Guest, Regal Books, Ventura, California, 1983
Jesus Hypotheses, V Messori, St Paul Publications, Slough, 1977
Science and the Bible, Henry Morris, Moody Press, Bucks, 1988
Science Speaks, Peter W Stoner, Robert C Newman, Moody Press, Chicago, 1976
The Bible Code, Michael Drosnin, Orion, London, 2000
The Case for Jesus the Messiah, John Ankerberg Harvest House, Eugene, Oregon, 1989
The Hard Sayings of Jesus, FF Bruce, Hodder & Stoughton, London, 1983
The Late Great Planet Earth, Hal Lindsay, Lakeland, London, 1974
The Signature of God, Grant R Jeffrey, Marshall Pickering, London, 1998
The Truth Behind the Bible Code, Dr Jeffrey Satinover, Sidgwick & Jackson, London, 1997
The Truth of Christianity, WH Turton, Wells Gardner, Darton & Co Ltd, London, 1905
The Unauthorised Version, Robin Lane Fox, Penguin, Middlesex, 1992
The Virginal Conception and Bodily Resurrection of Jesus, Raymond E Brown, Paulist Press, New York, 1973
Theodore Parker’s Discourses, Theodore Parker, Longmans, Green, Rader and Dyer, London, 1876
Whatever Happened to Heaven, Dave Hunt, Harvest House, Eugene, Oregon, 1988
 
The WWW
 
www.infidels.org/library/modern/jim_lippard/fabulous-prophecies.html
The Fabulous Prophecies of the Messiah by Jim Lippard
This site argues that Daniel’s prophecy if punctuated by the Masoretic method gives a totally different meaning from the one Christians want it to have and which eliminates all attempts to make the prophecy predict the year of Jesus’ death. It shows how Gleason Archer misrepresented a verse from Jeremiah as referring to Judas betraying Jesus for money and left out bits that proved that it did not refer to that event. For example, he deliberately hides the fact that Jeremiah said 17 shekels while Jesus was betrayed for 30 shekels. The Christians now say that Isaiah 7:14 was fulfilled in Ahab’s time but was meant to be a double-fulfilment prophecy meaning that it predicted Jesus’ virgin birth as well or that it could be applied to Jesus’ birth too and was meant to be. That is ridiculous. You could say that Isaiah 53, where the suffering and death of Christ is allegedly predicted, is geared towards a double fulfilment too. And how could either it or Isaiah 7:14 be double prophecies when they each speak of only one event? The double-fulfilment idea is just imagining prophecies of Jesus where there are none and ignoring the wording of Isaiah. The site also tells us how silly the claim that the contradictory genealogies in Matthew and Luke that were given for Jesus that they can be reconciled is. The Catholic Church claims that both lists are accurate but the differences are down to levirate marriage. Levirate marriage is when a childless man dies his brother is obliged to take his wife and impregnate her with babies that are considered to belong to the dead man. So each gospeller just chose different people as part of the line. This is garbage for they differ in the number of ancestors. And my comment is that there would not have been that many levirate marriages.
 
www.infidels.org/library/modern/farrell_till/prophecy.html
Prophecies: Imaginary and Unfulfilled by Farrell Till
This site points out that in the original Hebrew, Micah 5:2 says that the Messiah will come out of the house of Ephrathah in Bethlehem meaning the clan or family of Ephrathah. Matthew thought it meant land. Since there is no evidence that Jesus came from this family, there is therefore no evidence that the prophecy was about him though the Gospel of Matthew tries to make out that it was. Therefore it is an abuse of scripture to say that the prophecy means Jesus. Also Matthew misread Zechariah and thought he said that the king would ride on both an ass and her colt. My comment is that for Jesus to fulfil that he had to be a proper king anointed and enthroned but Jesus was never anointed or sat in a throne. He claimed to be a king but that was not much to go on. Otherwise anybody would do as a fulfilment as long as they claimed to be king. God also promised the land to the Israelites no matter what evil they did on account of his having promised Abraham, Isaac and Jacob (Deuteronomy 9:3-6) and indeed gave them the land though he considered them totally undeserving (Exodus 33:1-6). His promise was unconditional and yet many times they lost the land. My comment is that in the last millennium the Jews were no better or worse than any other nation and were good enough people and still their land was not theirs any more. God broke his promise or the Bible is slandering him. But with Christians the Bible will come first.
 
www.mindspring.com/~bab5/BIB/lessons.htm Daniel 9:17-27 Seventy Weeks of Years
This page argues regarding Daniel’s 70 weeks prophecy that since the author of Daniel knew Jeremiah pretty well and how Jeremiah’s prophecy that Israel would be exiled for 70 years proved false for it was 48 years that he probably assumed that the 70 years were not literal and so he might have not meant his 70 weeks to give a specific time span. It also points out how the conservatives often add the before the word anointed in verse 25 to make it seem that Jesus is being referred to and even go as far as to pretend that the seven weeks and the sixty-two weeks add up to sixty nine weeks when they could be running concurrently and indeed must be for the writer could have written 69 weeks instead of 7 and 62 weeks. It shows that the Jewish year was not 360 days long for they had reason to add on a month every three years which means that Jesus would have died about 38 AD which Christians cannot accept for Pilate was axed in 37 AD.
 
www.infidels.org/library/modern/steven_carr/non-messianic.html, Steven Carr, Critique of Josh McDowells Non-Messianic Prophecies This Site cannot be overly recommended. It is superb.
 
www.mindspring.com/~bab5/BIB/lessons.htm, The Suffering Servant of Isaiah 53
 
www.mindspring.com/~bab5/BIB/lessons.htm, Isaiah 53’s Suffering Servant Israel
 
http://human.st/jesuspuzzle/CTVExcerptsTwo.htm, Challenging the Verdict

www.fortunecity.com/greenfield/bp/890/interpretation.html, The Infamous Isaiah Scam

http://web2/airmail.net/bennoahl/isa53no7.htm, What You Were Never Taught in the Christian Church…The Truth About Isaiah 53